We’re motivated by something greater than the bottom-line. We believe in supporting both the health of the education system in the United States and the well-being of each and every student. So we make a point to share what we learn with others who are positioned to make a difference, too.

Trends in Student Social-Emotional Learning: Evidence From the First Large-Scale Panel Student Survey

We used social-emotional learning survey data to simulate how four constructs—growth mindset, self-efficacy, self-management, and social awareness—develop from grades 4 to 12 and how these trends vary by gender, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity among students for two consecutive years. We found that, with the exception of growth mindset, self-reports of these constructs do not increase monotonically as students move through school; self-efficacy, social awareness, and, to a lesser degree, self-management decrease after Grade 6.
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Contingent and Predictive Analytics

This memo provides an introduction into contingent analytics, a framework that attempts to bridge two methodologies that are quite different, but related: (1) predictive analytics and early warning systems and (2) evaluation methods.
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Producing long-term forecasts of individual student outcomes: An application of chain-linked models with short-span data and education policy regime change

We focus in this paper on using predictive analytics models to produce forecasts of high school graduation and college persistence outcomes for students as early as 3rd grade.
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SEL Best Practices Guide

This guide outlines the steps that organizations might consider for measuring students’ social and emotional learning (SEL). We highlight the lessons we have learned from the research that Education Analytics has conducted on SEL survey measures. We also discuss future directions of SEL measurement that policymakers and practitioners at the state and district level should consider.
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Can We Measure Classroom Supports for Social-Emotional Learning?

We applied value-added models to student surveys in the CORE Districts to explore whether social-emotional learning (SEL) surveys can be used to measure effective classroom-level supports for SEL. We found that classrooms differ in their effect on students’ growth in self-reported SEL—even after accounting for school-level effects.
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Stability of School Contributions to Student Social-Emotional Learning Gains

We estimated and examined the stability of school effects on SEL across two years, using a large-scale SEL survey administered in California’s CORE districts. We found that correlations among school effects in the same grades across different years are positive, but they are lower than those for math and English Language Arts. Schools in the top or the bottom of the school effect distribution are more persistent in their impacts across years than those in the middle of the distribution.
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School Differences in Social–Emotional Learning Gains: Findings From the First Large-Scale Panel Survey of Students

Using the first large-scale panel surveys of students on SEL, we produced school-level value-added measures by grade for growth mindset, self-efficacy, self-management, and social awareness. We found substantive differences across schools in SEL growth, with magnitudes of differences similar to those for growth in academic achievement, but weaker goodness of fit and smaller across-school variance, suggesting caution in interpreting such measures as causal impacts of schools on SEL.
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Measuring Students’ Social-Emotional Learning Among California’s CORE Districts: An IRT Modeling Approach

We analyzed the psychometric properties of items from California's CORE Districts' annual SEL survey. We compared items' functionality across grades, compared student outcomes from IRT models and the classical approach, made suggestions on approaches to modeling and scaling the SEL survey data, and identified items, by grade, that do not contribute positively to measurement of each outcome. We also discussed policy implications in using SEL measures among educators, administrators, policymakers, and other stakeholders.
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The Influence of Rapidly Guessed Item Responses on Teacher Value-Added Estimates

We examined whether rapid guessing behaviors varied by grade, subject, and teacher, and we evaluated if rapid guessing influenced teacher value-added estimates. We found that rapid guessing occurs frequently enough that educators should be mindful of its effect on the interpretations of student test results, but rapid guessing did not appear to affect estimates of teacher performance.
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